Category Archives: Computer Music – Software

Steinberg introduces Cubase 10

In what’s become a fairly regular feature in the calendar these days, we see the yearly update to Cubase making its appearance once more as we hurtle towards the final month of the year.

This time around sees us receive a full version update as we move on to Cubase 10. With the full version releases we expect to see plenty of new features creep in whilst the smaller updates and fixes tend to be the focus on the .5 release, so what exactly do we have in store this time around?

Working through the “what’s new” list for interesting updates and the first one that stands out is a revised channel strip promising to extend the functionality and usability of its included modules, with new metering elements offering direct visual feedback for each of those modules.

Mix console snapshots now allow you to set up alternative mixes for your project and A/B compare the results within seconds. By lettings you save your current mix into a tab within MixConsole you can then instantly switch between them at any time, adding notes to each snapshot as you go. You can even mix and match by choosing a part of the mix like the EQ settings from one snapshot and applying them to another one.

Next up we see a dedicated audio alignment tool being introduced, which no doubt is the sort of functionality that is going to be very well received by many users out there.

Variaudio gets its own overhaul with improved workflow and even more creative tools. Smart controls aim to speed up your workflow by allowing direct control of all parameters at each segment. Promising micro pitch level adjustments for smooth drifts and transitions and the capability to push it to the extreme in order to achieve popular extreme pitch effects, this is another tool update that is no doubt going to make a lot of users happy.

Groove Agent getting an update to SE5. Alongside those on the handy plugin side is a redesigned and updated REVerence along with a collection of Vintage Verb settings and a completely new “Distroyer” processor capable of adding subtle warmth or utterly destroying your audio for those extreme effects.

But GUI changes and new tools whilst all nice to have, are not going to be the highlight for a lot of users this time around. For the power users amongst us, the biggest bugbear for the last few years has been the 14 thread limit we’ve been seeing after last years Creators update moved the goalposts for Cubase and how it handles multiple cores, which certainly left a lot of users frustrated at lost performance overhead. Well, the good news is that we’re being promised “significant improvement” this time around, and we’ve heard that they’ve been working on this for a while behind the scenes, so this alone could prove an extremely worthwhile upgrade for anyone running 8 or more physical cores.

The new Latency Monitor in the MixConsole promises to give you enhanced control whilst your monitoring and recording by now displaying both the sum of the latencies and the individual latency of each plug-in bugbear the effects chain viable. This should make it easier to track down any painful lag when working with effects cores in a live situation and should prove to be of benefit to many users.

Side-chaining which for a long time was a bit of a weak spot for Cubase gets another overhaul this time around, with further refinements to the process. The new simplified method will allow you to create the desired routing via just a few clicks by activating the side-chaining in your FX plug-in and selecting the source from the track list and away you go.

Other interesting technical updates include adding support for 32-bit integer and 64-bit float audio formats, AAF import and export options, along with additional MPE support for those users making use of capable controllers.

Productivity wise there is a host of improved “editing to picture” features for those doing sound for film work as well as a  full “Virtual Reality production suite” featuring a whole host of tools specifically designed for producing VR content all the way from the recording to mastering stages.

All in all an interesting set of updates and some much-needed fixes carried out behind the scenes. We’ll certainly looking forward to road testing this edition in the near future.

All Steinberg kit @ Scan

Native Instruments unleash their largest ever range refresh!

Native Instruments have really gone all out this year, with a huge range refresh taking place and a raft of new products fresh out of Berlin.

Komplete 12 

The Komplete 12 Edition

The flagship collection package reaches it’s 12th revision and adds even more instruments and sound libraries to the collection.

Amongst the headline updates here include a follow up to the now legendary “Massive” synth with Massive X making it into the pack. The original Massive had a huge impact upon the softsynth world as well as EDM and dance music in general, so whilst current details are still scarce the promise of a whole new engine and a modular workflow is certainly going to have people eagerly awaiting the full reveal in the coming months.

We also see the release of Kontakt 6 as another heavy hitter and various sound libraries like Session Strings 2 and a host of extra expansion packs such as the Middle East discovery series, Analog Dreams, Ethereal Earth and Hybrid keys packs also for Kontakt.

Kontakt 6 and its new WaveTable Module

The new TRK-01 “Kick and Bass” instrument is in there too, as well as creative effects like Phasis, Choral and Flair making up a sizable number of new and improved tools on this revision release.

For a more complete list of all that can be found in the new Komplete 12 bundle, click the image below to expand.

Komplete 12 Bundle Contents
Komplete 12 Full Bundle List – Click to expand

Komplete Kontrol – A Series

Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol A61

Taking the already popular Kontrol keyboard range and releasing a cut-down version makes so much sense to us, that we wonder how it hasn’t happened sooner. Promising the same great design experience we’ve come to expect from the “S” series models, whilst getting the option to pick one up without all the bells and whistles.

That’s not to say they are featureless, with plenty of pre-mapped controls for all of your most used N.I. libraries software they’ll certainly help to improve your workflow for anyone who makes good use of packages like Kontakt already.

The keyboards will be shipping with a solid collection of plug-ins too, offering versions of Komplete Instruments and effects as well as the Machine Essentials libraries. They will be available in three different sizes which are 25, 49 and 61 note editions.

Komplete Kontrol – S88 MKII

Komplete Kontrol - S88 MKII
Komplete Kontrol – S88 MKII

Not to be left out, the “S” series gets an update too, although just the largest S88 model at this time. The rest of the range has already had their MK2 editions out for some time, so really we’re just seeing the S88 being brought into line with the rest of the range, but none the less always good to see an update.

Some of the smart play features feel like they might be a little un-needed for someone willing to invest this much in a good playing keyboard,but it none the less continues to feature one of the best in class fully weighted Fatar keybeds and offering the same great software packages as the A-series mentioned above make it a serious contender for anyone considering a with keyboard upgrade in the future.

Maschine Mikro Mk3

Maschine Mikro Mk3

Another model refresh and the big news here is the new touch strip, designed to add even more hands-on control. Not such a major overhaul here, but for anyone who’s been thinking about picking up a Mikro anyway, then more features to play with are always great I’m sure we can all agree!

Traktor Pro and Traktor S2 & S4 Mk3’s.

Traktor 3 is due to ship with the two new controller revisions and offers up a number of improvements under the hood. The audio engine uses the Elastique 3 time stretching engine for noticeable audio improvements whilst playing. 

Traktor 3 Pro
Traktor Pro 3

The interface GUI has been redesigned to offer additional clarity in use and the few other new knobs and buttons have been added, most notably the one knob “Mixer FX” control that can be assigned to each channel independently.

Traktor S2
Traktor S2

The S2 has had some hands-on optimizations in the shape of up-sized jog wheels and increased touch sensitivity, giving users even more control when mixing and scratching.

The big change here, however, is in the S4 model, which sees the introduction of Haptic Drive which offers us high-torque, motorized jog wheels that provide performers with haptic feedback in three modes: Jog Mode, Turntable Mode, and Beatgrid Adjust Mode.

DJs can now feel cue points and loops when scrolling through tracks, and enable Turntable Mode for natural-feeling beatmatching while nudging and stalling the jog wheels. Interfacing software and hardware within Haptic Drive™ technology means that its functionality can be expanded, and will grow over the course of future updates, giving DJs even more ways to interact with their music.

Traktor S4

The S4 places vital performance information on the hardware itself, keeping everything DJs need to know front and follow up in the booth. High-resolution displays on each deck display a waveform strip, track title, loop length and activation, key, and BPM, as well as Stem and Remix Deck components when performing with Stems and samples. Further visual feedback is provided by RGB light rings surrounding each jog wheel, which visualize deck selection, tempo, and track-end warnings.

Online Platforms

It’s not all hardware and software today through as a number of online services have had updates too.

Sounds.com is due to exit beta and is a service offering an ever-growing collection of over 700,000 high-quality loops and samples from over 250 providers for a monthly subscription fee. 

We’re advised that this is the culmination of months of continuous expansion and improvement based on user feedback, with the aim to provide musicians of all levels an easy and affordable way to access an ever-growing library of high-quality loops and samples with plenty more to be added going forward.

Also receiving a redesign is Metapop, which is NI’s online hub for music makers to share, connect, and collaborate with like-minded creators. In the site relaunch, NI is launching a newly redesigned Metapop, with a new user experience focused on making it easier to connect, share, and collaborate with fellow music makers.

After listening to the feedback from its users, NI has added new features like groups and chats, helping creators to find their community, connect with others, and get feedback on their music. Additionally, a new mobile version of the site lets users upload, connect, and listen to newly released samples – whether at home or on-the-go.

Lastly “Loop Loft” who joined the N.I. stable back in January this year is also receiving a site redesign. The Loop Loft itself continues to provide an ever-growing source of inspirational content to help producers learn and grow, including exclusive tutorials, interviews, and tips from leading industry professionals.

Check out the full Native Instruments range @ Scan

Apogee and Eventide Team Up for 2018

For a limited time, if you buy an Apogee Ensemble or Element series Thunderbolt audio interface you will receive a discount code for a free six month subscription to the Eventide Ensemble Bundle!

Apogee interfaces are renowned in the industry for super clean conversion and the sound of Eventide’s hardware can be found littered all over numerous releases from the past 40 odd years so this is a match made in heaven for audio purists.

If you’ve ever wanted to try out the H910 harmonizer, Blackhole reverb, H3000 or any of the other iconic effects then now is your chance!

The offer runs from July 10th 2018 through January 10th 2019

Apogee Element Series available here

Apogee Ensemble available here

Zoom G5n, G3n, G3Xn or B3n user? Software Update: Guitar Lab 3.0

If you happen to own any of the Zoom pedals in the title then Guitar Lab 3.0  really is worth your time to download, get to know and put to good use. An excellent way to edit and create new patches for your unit and visually a treat to use.

If you do not own one of the aforementioned pedals just click the units below for all the information you need on each of the pedals.

 

 

 

For G5n, G3n, G3Xn and B3n users Zoom’s Guitar Lab software has been a one-stop shop for free, instant downloads of patches, effects and amp/cabinet emulators. With regular updates, creators have had access to a constant stream of new, exciting tools. The simple UI made even new creators comfortable experimenting.
Now, Guitar Lab 3.0, a break-through version of the classic software is making patch and effects management even easier.

Guitar Lab 3.0 includes new features such as:

  • A totally new Patch Editor which allows users to add, edit, rearrange, delete effects to create their own patches
  • Patch Clips enabling users to store, share and quickly build new patches from their favorite effect combinations.
  • Enhanced effect processing display in the Effect and Editor views to help users select the best effects to maximize their sound and optimize hardware CPU
  • An integrated News view to keep users informed of the latest patch updates with new content being downloaded from Zoom each time the user runs the app and clicks the News
  • An updated Effect View featuring detailed parameter descriptions for each effect, eliminating the need for users to download and reference the Effect List file

https://www.zoom.co.jp/news/GuitarLab_v3

 

Time To Get Your Inner Vangelis On! Arminator 2 Released by Krakli Plugs

Arminator is a much loved free CS-80 emulation from Krakli Plugs. While not designed to be an out and out pure emulation it sure does a fantastic job of dishing out Vangelis style sounds aplenty.

 

 

After spending  some time last weekend meticulously multi-sampling Arminator for use with the MPC Live, yesterday saw an update on their Facebook page informing the masses of the new and improved Arminator 2 with a whopping 5 banks of 128 patches!

 

Fresh additions include:

The ability to KeySplit anywhere on a key across 10 octaves

Chorus effect

Mono Poly on individual lines

Better scaling of some controls (Filter Freq etc)

Ability to sync the LFO to KeyPress

Keytracking on the LowPass Filter

Sine Oscillator on the Line Amp can now be a 1 or 2 sub octave

Line 2’s Envelope can be delayed by up to 500ms from keypress

 

I absolutely adore the sound of this plugin, and this is of course helped by the amazing patch design.

Unfortunately it is 32-bit only but this can easily be rectified by an app like JBridge if your DAW doesnt include a bridge of it’s own.

 

Krakli Plugs Facebook page:      https://www.facebook.com/groups/Krakli/

The Impact Of Meltdown And Spectre For Audio Workstations

No doubt, the hottest topic in I.T. at the start of 2018 continues to be the CPU security risks that have come to light as 2017 came to a close.

Otherwise known as “Spectre” and “Meltdown ” an exhaustive amount of information has been written already in regards to how these design choices can lead to data being accessed within the computer by processes or other code that shouldn’t have access to it, potentially leaving the system open to attacks by malicious code run on the computer.

For instance one of the more concerning attack vectors in this scenario are servers hosting multiple customers on one system, and in a world where it might be common to hear about many virtual machines being used in a hosting environment in order to keep them separate and secure, allowing this type of code to access the data with poor security in place opens up the possibility of transaction details, passwords and other customer records in a manner that has obviously raised a large amount of concern in both security professionals and end consumers alike.

Off the back of this have emerged the patches and updates required to solve the issue, and along with those are some rather alarming headline figures regarding performance levels potentially taking a hit, with claims of anywhere up to 30% overhead being eaten away by certain types of workload.

As there are many great resources already explaining this including this one here that can help outline what is going on, I’m not going to delve too much into the background of the issues, rather focus on the results of the updates being applied. 

We’re going to look at both the Microsoft patch at a software level and test the BIOS update released to support it. There are two issues here with Meltdown and Spectre and there happens to be two variants of Spectre, one of which can be handled at the software level, with the other requiring the microcode update applied via a BIOS update.

Microsoft has, of course, released their own advisory notes which are certainly worth a review too and available here.  At this time it is advised that Meltdown and all Spectre variants can both affect Intel CPU’s and some ARM compatible mobile chips, whereas AMD is only affected by the Spectre variants with AMD themselves having just issued an updated advisement at the time of writing which can be found here. This is also largely an  OS platform agnostic issue with Microsoft, Apple, Linux and even mobile OS’s all having the potential to be affected and over the last few weeks rapidly deploying updates and patches to their users.

At this point, I’m just going to quote a portion taken from the Microsoft link above verbatim, as it outlines the performance concerns we’re going to look at today. Keep in mind that in the text below “variant 1 & 2” are both referring to the Spectre issues, whereas Meltdown is referred to as simply “variant 3”.

One of the questions for all these fixes is the impact they could have on the performance of both PCs and servers. It is important to note that many of the benchmarks published so far do not include both OS and silicon updates. We’re performing our own sets of benchmarks and will publish them when complete, but I also want to note that we are simultaneously working on further refining our work to tune performance. In general, our experience is that Variant 1 and Variant 3 mitigations have minimal performance impact, while Variant 2 remediation, including OS and microcode, has a performance impact.

Here is the summary of what we have found so far:

  • With Windows 10 on newer silicon (2016-era PCs with Skylake, Kabylake or newer CPU), benchmarks show single-digit slowdowns, but we don’t expect most users to notice a change because these percentages are reflected in milliseconds.
  • With Windows 10 on older silicon (2015-era PCs with Haswell or older CPU), some benchmarks show more significant slowdowns, and we expect that some users will notice a decrease in system performance.
  • With Windows 8 and Windows 7 on older silicon (2015-era PCs with Haswell or older CPU), we expect most users to notice a decrease in system performance.
  • Windows Server on any silicon, especially in any IO-intensive application, shows a more significant performance impact when you enable the mitigations to isolate untrusted code within a Windows Server instance. This is why you want to be careful to evaluate the risk of untrusted code for each Windows Server instance, and balance the security versus performance tradeoff for your environment.

For context, on newer CPUs such as on Skylake and beyond, Intel has refined the instructions used to disable branch speculation to be more specific to indirect branches, reducing the overall performance penalty of the Spectre mitigation. Older versions of Windows have a larger performance impact because Windows 7 and Windows 8 have more user-kernel transitions because of legacy design decisions, such as all font rendering taking place in the kernel. We will publish data on benchmark performance in the weeks ahead.

The testing outlined here today is based on current hardware and Windows 10. Specifically, the board is an Asus Z370 Prime A, running on a Samsung PM961 M.2. drive, with a secondary small PNY SSD attached. The CPU is an i5 8600 and the is 16GB of memory in the system.

Software wise updates for windows were completed right up to the 01/01/18 point and the patch from Microsoft to address this was released on 03/01/18 and is named “KB4056892”. I start the testing with the 605 BIOS from late 2017 and move through to the 606 BIOS designed to address the microcode update specified by Intel. 

Early reports have suggested a hit to the drive subsystem, so at each stage, I’m going to test this and of course, I’ll be monitoring the CPU performance as each step is applied. Also keep in mind that as outlined in the Microsoft advisory above, different generations of hardware and solutions from different suppliers will be affected differently, but as Intel is suggested as being the hardest hit by these problems, it makes sense to examine a current generation to start with.

The Testing 

Going into this, I was hopeful that we wouldn’t be expecting to see a whole load of processing power lost simply due to the already public explanations of how the flaw could potentially affect the system didn’t read as being one that should majorly impact the way an audio system handles itself.

Largely it’s played out as expected, as when you’re working away within your sequencer the ASIO driver is there doing its best to keep itself as a priority and generally, if the system is tuned to work well for music, the shouldn’t be a million programs in the background that should be affected by this and causing the update to steal processing time. So, given we’re not running the sort of a server related workloads that I would expect to cause too much of an upset here, I was fairly confident that the impact shouldn’t be as bad as some suggestions had made out and largely on the processing side it plays out like that. 

However, prior to starting the testing, it was reported that storage subsystems were taking a hit due to these patches and that of course demanded that we take a look at it along the way too. Starting with the worst news first, those previous reports are very much on the ball. I had two drives connected and below we see the first set of results taken from a Samsung M.2. SM961 model drive.

M2 Test After Applying Meltdown Changes
Click to expand – Results From Left To Right – 1, Baseline Result. 2, After Microsoft Update. 3, With update and BIOS patch applied.

To help give you a little more background on what’s being tested here, each test should be as follows:

  • Seq Q32T1 – sequential read/ write with multiple threads and queues
  • 4K Q32T1 – random read/ write with multiple threads and queues
  • Seq – sequential read/ write with a single queue and thread
  • 4K – random read/ write with a single queue and thread.

The is no doubt a performance hit here to the smaller 4k files which are amplified as more threads are taken up to handle the workload in the 4K Q32T1 test.  On the flip side of this is that the sequential handling seems to either escape relatively unscathed and in some instances even improved to some degree, so there is some trade-off here depending on the workload it’s handling.

The gains did confuse me at first and whilst first sifting through the data I started to wonder if perhaps given we were running off the OS drive, and perhaps other services had skewed it slightly. Thankfully, I also had a project SDD hooked up to the system as well, so we can compare a second data point against the first.

SSD meltdown testing
Click to expand, Results left to right. 1, Baseline. 2, After Microsoft Patch. 3, After BIOS update.

The 4k results still show a decrease and the sequential once again hold fairly steady with a few read gains, so it looks like some rebalancing to the performance levels has taken place here too, whether intentional or not.

The DAWBench testing, on the other hand with the DSP test, ends up with a more positive result.  This time around I’ve pulled out the newer SGA based DSP test, as well as the Kontakt based DAWBench VI test and both were run within Reaper. 

SGA test for Meltdown
Click to expand

The result of the DSP test which concentrates on loading the CPU up shows little difference that doesn’t fall within the margin of error & variance.  It should also be noted that the CPU was running at 99% CPU load when it topped out, so we don’t appear to be losing any overhead here in that regard.

DAWBench VI test for Meltdown
Click to expand.

With the Kontakt based DAWBench VI test, we’re seeing anything between 5% and 8% overhead reduction depending on the ASIO buffer, with the tightest 64 buffer suffering after each update whereas the looser settings coped better with the software update before taking a small hit when we get up to the 256 buffer.

The Verdict

Ultimately the concern here is how will it impact you in real terms?

The minor loss of overhead on the second testing set was from a Kontakt heavy project and the outcome from the drive tests would suggest that anyone with sample library that has a heavy reliance on disk streaming may wish to be careful here with any projects that are already on the edge prior to the update being applied.

I also timed that project being loaded across all 3 states of the update process as I went with the baseline time frame to open the project being 20 seconds. After the software update, we didn’t see a change in this time span, with the project still taking 20 seconds to open. However, the BIOS update once applied along with the OS update added 2 seconds to this giving us roughly a 10% increase in the project load time.

So at this time, whilst any performance is certainly not welcome, we’re not seeing quite the huge skew in the performance stakes that has been touted thankfully, and certainly well short of the 30% figure that was being suggested initially for the CPU hit.

There have been suggestions by Microsoft that older generations might be more severely affected and from the description of how it affects servers I suspect that we may well see that 30% figure and even higher under certain workloads in server environments, but I suspect that it’ll be more centered around the database or virtual machine server workstation segments than the creative workstation user base.

Outside of our small corner of the world, TechSpot has been running a series of tests since the news broke and it’s interesting to see other software outside of the audio workstation environment seems to be largely behaving the same for a lot of end users, as are the storage setups that they have tested. If you’d like to read through those you can do so here.

Looking Forward

The issue was discovered over the course of 2017 back but largely kept under wraps so it couldn’t be exploited at the time. However, the existence of the problem leaked before the NDA was lifted and feels like a few solutions that have been pushed out in the days since may have been a little rushed in order to stop anyone more unethical capitalizing upon it. 

As such, I would expect performance to bounce around over the next few months as they test, tweak and release new drivers, firmware and BIOS solutions. The concern right now for firms is ensuring that systems around the world are secure and I would expect there to be a period of optimization to follow once they have removed the risk of malware or worse impacting the end user.

Thankfully, it’s possible to remove the patch after you apply it, so in a worst case scenario you can still revert back and block it should it have a more adverse effect upon your system, although it will then leave you open to possible attacks. Of course, leaving the machine offline will obviously protect you, but then that can be a hard thing to do in a modern studio where software maintenance and remote collaboration are both almost daily requirements for many users. 

However you choose to proceed, will no doubt be system and situation specific and I suspect as updates appear the best practice for your system may change over the coming months. Certainly, the best advice I can offer here is to keep your eye on how this develops, make the choices that keep you secure without hampering your workflow and review the situation going forward to see if further optimizations can help restore the situation to pre-patch levels as a resolve for the problem is worked upon by both the hardware and software providers. 

Cashback Offer on Roli Seaboard Rise 25 and 49

Roli have a nice little offer available for anybody wishing to jump into world of the funky 5D-touch Seaboard Rise controllers.

Unfortunately Roli hadn’t sorted out their website at the start of the promo so I held back from making a song and dance about it but that situation has now changed and the site is alive and kicking. Any purchases of the Seaboard Rise 25 and 49 between October 23rd and December 24th are eligible for  £75 and £150 cashback respectively from Roli. That’s not bad at all to be fair!

For anyone not aware of these controllers they are pretty unique all things considered. the keyboard is made of a pressure-sensitive squishy grey, sensor embedded material that allows you to shape sound through touch – strike the keywaves, press into them, glide sideways along them and slide up and down the keywaves to venture into new sonic territory.

Of course this is no good without an MPE (Multidimensional Polyphonic Expression) compatible synth so Roli have kindly included Equator, their custom-built software synthesizer and sound engine. A perfect companion for these otherwordly keybeds!

After purchase, simply visit https://rolicashback.com to redeem the offer.

You can find the Roli Seaboards here!

Tips & Tricks: Kontakt Optimization – The Purge Function

Keeping in line with my recent tips on how to optimize Kontakt, here’s a great way of conserving memory. This is something that could prove to be invaluable for composers in particular due to the nature of the instruments they’ll typically be hosting in their templates. Large multi-sampled orchestral libraries can potentially use large amounts of RAM. Keeping that memory footprint as small as possible is important for obvious reasons.

Utilizing the purge function can free up RAM by unloading any unused samples. Some libraries allow you to do this from within the library UI whereby you’re able to deselect certain articulations or disable certain mic positions. This can be seen in Spitfire Audio’s Albion One Library below.

Here’s the available functions available in the Purge menu:

  • Reset Markers – When a sample is played it marks it as being used by Kontakt. This function removes the markers but doesn’t purge anything so keeps the samples loaded.
  • Update Sample Pool – Purges all the unused samples
  • Purge All Samples – Unloads all samples
  • Reloads All Samples – Loads all samples contained within the instrument

There’s a few ways you can go about implementing the integrated purge function. You could start with all samples within an instrument loaded (like it loads up by default). Once you’ve successfully laid down your part you could then simply reset the markers, run through the part from start to finish, then update the sample pool. This will unload any unused samples.

Alternatively, you could start with all samples purged within an instrument. Then as you input your MIDI it’ll load the used samples in on the fly. It’s important to bear in mind if you decide to use this method and you’re using hard disk drives to host your samples, you may experience a few clicks/pops/missing notes on the first run through as the samples load from the disk. I’d certainly recommend using SSDs if you use this method.

Notice the yellow indicator below after purging the Armageddon Ensemble patch (form Heavyocity’s Damage library), then playing a few notes. Also note the amount of RAM used!

DFD (Direct From Disk) settings should also be considered here. When using DFD, only the first part of the sample is loaded into the RAM. The DFD buffer setting determines how much of the sample is pre-loaded into the memory. Lower settings load less of the sample into the memory so will decrease your memory footprint. As more of the sample is being loaded directly from the disk it goes without saying that SSDs will perform better than mechanical disks.

Working with a large template and having every sample in every patch loaded may not be the most efficient way of working. Using this method, you could theoretically build a template consisting of many patches, each with the samples unloaded whilst keeping your memory footprint relatively small. You’d just simply load in the samples as and when you need them.

Hopefully the methods I’ve discussed over recent weeks will help you get the most out of Kontakt. If you missed my previous articles, here they are for quick reference:

Tips & Tricks: The Kontakt Quick-Load Feature

Tips & Tricks: Kontakt Optimization – The Batch Re-save Feature

 

 

Steinberg Cubase 9.5 released

Today Steinberg announced the annual Cubase update, this time its version 9.5.

Following the Tick-Tock pattern of releases for the past few years, They’ve integrated a raft of new features that are all very welcome, especially to a 25 year veteran such as myself. 

The highlights for me are as below. 

64 Bit Mix Engine
The internal mix-engine has been upgraded to 64 bit, this is a a fantastic upgrade for headroom and accuracy, but dont take it as a green light to drive your channels hard, as many plugins (about 50% on my last non-scientific test) are still dependent on getting hit with an input level below 0dB. 

More Inserts
The fixed number of inserts has always been a little bane of my production life, previously causing you to have to bus out to a subgroup if you run out, but 9.5 doubles the amount of available slots and also lets you pick the division between pre and post fader effects.  

Lets Get Curvy
Finally, we get true curves on the automation, perfect for smoothing out those highly resonant sweeps on VSTi’s. 

Metronome
Cubase Pro users can now customise their metronome clicks, load their own sounds and save multiple different patterns to use. 

Right Zone Additions
The previous monitoring zone on the right hand side now has a media browser together with your metering and cue mix controls. 

Flux
Halion Sonic SE gets its own wavetable synth library in the form of Flux, a new sound source is always a welcome addition to spark some inspiration in the production process and it’s loaded with over 70 different waveforms.

Adapt to Zoom
This features decreases the snap resolution when zoomed out for more effective editing. 

Console 1
Softube Console 1 owners can now select tracks and control volume pan and sends from the hardware interface

ReSkinned FX
Steinberg’s own plugins are somewhat overlooked, but three have had a nice GUI update. 

Cubase 9.5 @ Steinberg

Tips & Tricks: Kontakt Optimization – The Batch Re-save Feature

Native Instruments Kontakt is one of my most commonly used tools in the studio so it’s massively important to ensure it’s performing as efficiently as possible. I’ve previously touched on how to enhance workflow with the Quick-Load feature but there’s another little tip to optimize instrument load-up times regardless of whether you’re using a beast of computer or whether you’re running a rig with limited resources. This is something that can be particularly beneficial for composers who will more than likely be using large templates where hosting multiple orchestral libraries is the norm.

Anyone who has ever used Kontakt will undoubtedly have encountered the “Missing Samples” error. It’s easily enough resolved by selecting the location where the samples for library in question reside. It’s a case of then saving the patch so that the file paths are preserved.

The Batch Re-save function goes one step further and allows you to correct the file paths for an entire library but it can also drastically improve load-up times especially for larger, more ram-intensive libraries and almost certainly if your sample libraries are hosted on mechanical drives. This process will effectively re-assign the samples to each patch within the library accordingly based on your own system’s storage configuration.

To do this simply select the “File” menu and hit “Batch re-save”. You’ll be presented with a warning message. As long as you then select the original folder where the library is located (typically one level above the “Samples” folder) this is nothing to worry about. The reason for this warning being if any 2 instruments utilize the same naming structure for their samples, this process could potentially assign the wrong sample to the wrong instrument.

Then just sit back and watch as all the file paths are checked are re-assigned. Depending on the size of the library, this can sometimes take a while but it’s well worth it in the long run.

Batch re-saving is now the first thing I do whenever I install a new library. From personal experience I can honestly say this has greatly improved my instrument load-up times. Give it a try… See if it makes a difference!