Cubase 7: Voxengo Curve EQ

 

Voxengo Curve EQ:

Within Cubase 7 is a plug-in with a feature, which in essence has been around a while, but Voxengo really do make it easy to use…

 

I’m talking ‘Spectrum matching function’ and it’s very cool.

 

Most of us have a favourite album where the production is just perfect, and we’d give anything to emulate it (mine happens to be Jellyfish’s  “Spilt Milk”, but there you go…)

 

Whatever genre or style, the Voxengo Curve EQ can analyse it and apply it to the current mix you’re working on, and once you’ve learnt how to do it, it can be invaluable as a tool for mastering in different genres (Country and Western advert ?  I’ll just strap Dolly’s EQ across it!!!)

 

Spectrum matching function is accessible via the “Static Spectrum Editor” window

(which is opened by the “Static & Match” button on the user interface).

 

Here’s the skinny from the manual…..

 

When you perform spectrum matching it is suggested to switch spectrum type in the

“Spectrum Mode Editor” to “Avg” so that average spectrum is used for matching

instead of a default real-time spectrum which may give inconsistent matching results.

You also need to run the averaging for several seconds until the visible spectrum

becomes smooth enough. After achieving the required spectrum shape on the screen

you can press the “Take” (or “Take 2nd”) button once in the static spectrum slot to

store this spectrum for matching purposes. Note that if there is no secondary

spectrum available (it was not configured in the “Spectrum Mode Editor”), the “Take

2nd” button will appear dimmed.

You need at least two spectrum snapshots in two slots for matching. The spectrum

you would like to equalize and the reference spectrum should be marked with the

“Apply To” and “Reference” switches, respectively. You can define more than one

“Apply to” or “Reference” spectrum – in that case the “average of two” spectrum will

be used.

 

You need at least two spectrum snapshots in two slots for matching. The spectrum

you would like to equalize and the reference spectrum should be marked with the

“Apply To” and “Reference” switches, respectively. You can define more than one

“Apply to” or “Reference” spectrum – in that case the “average of two” spectrum will

be used.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The point is that for any of you guys out there working in different styles, or producing ‘soundalikes’, this is a hell of a plug-in for helping you to achieve a believable end result.

 

Oh, and as I said earlier, Cubase 7 Rocks as well!!        LN48346.

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